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Baabul - Music Review

Published: Monday, November 6, 2006, 11:06 [IST]

By: Joginder Tuteja, IndiaFM
Monday, November 06, 2006
Team of Baghban is back with Baabul. In continuation to the trend of family socials from B R Films, Baabul too follows the same route as it deals with the subject of widow rehabilitation. Starring Big B in the title role with Hema Malini, Salman Khan, Rani Mukheree and John Abraham, Baabul had it's own share of issues throughout its shoot but credit to director Ravi Chopra that he kept a brave face and brought the film to finishing line. Aadesh Shrivastava, who gave some memorable songs for Baghban, is back with Baabul along with lyricist Sameer.

From a movie like Baabul, one expects a musical score which is core Indian at heart. While it certainly holds true after one is through listening the album, the thought at the top of the mind is - Why is Aadesh Srivastava heard so rarely, especially with the most reputed banners? If given an opportunity, as in case of Baabul, he can come up with quite an impressive score.

Amitabh Bachchan had sung a number of songs for Aadesh in Baghban. Same is not the case with Baabul where he croons only one track 'Come On Come On'. A beautifully arranged and programmed number that has an amazing rhythm kick starting the proceedings, 'Come On' has Amitabh Bachchan and Sonu Nigam simply freaking out throughout the proceedings. This one is not your typical 'bhangra' track but instead is much more with an innovative fusion of pop, rap-n-reggae and background voice inputs (Vishal, Aadesh Shrivastva, Ranjit Barot) interspersed with the celebration mood of 'Come On Come On'.

Just like tracks by Pritam which have a lot of funk and English inclusions, 'Come On Come On' too relies a lot on rhythm and succeeds in a big way. Later in the song, it is sheer fun to see Big B and Sonu Nigam exchanging verbal volleys of one-upmanship that keeps the proceedings exciting. Towards the album's end comes the remix version which anyways seemed quite essential on hearing the original. High on pace with an added funk, this one would be soon heard on the dance floors. Aadesh Srivastava has a clear winner here in 'Come On Come On'

After a rocking beginning, album takes a melodious route with 'Keh Raha Hai', a love duet between Sonu Nigam and Shreya Ghoshal. A sweet-n-simple song that goes quite easy on arrangements [in sheer contrast with 'Come On'], 'Keh Raha Hai' is a kind of melody that seldom fails and keeps a regular Bollywood buff entertained. A song which reminds one of the kinds of songs that Anand Milind used to compose around a decade and a half back, it guarantees eye candy visuals.

It's retro time with the arrival of 'Har Manzar' that has a sound of late 70s/early 80s. In spite of being a stage number, it doesn't go ballistic in its treatment and instead retains a softer touch. Kunal Ganjawala is at the helm of affairs here and he too is restrained in his rendition, hence making 'Har Manzar' a decent song to hum around. In fact when one hears the song closely, the musical instruments and light chorus in the background along with a continued rhythm make it a certified retro number.

Later in the album, DJ Suketu is called upon for the remix version of 'Har Manzar'. One dreaded a thought of the remix version going out of control since the soft music heard in the original would have been preferred any time but to one's pleasant surprise, this version too flows smoothly with only an instrument or two added to spice it up a little. Overall, the song is not the one which would be a single most reason to make Baabul a chartbuster fare but it contributes decently.

Proceedings become suddenly very sober with 'Kehta Hai Baabul'. Well, that is quite expected with Jagjit Singh rendering the song. A number about a father's love for his daughter and his fear of living alone once she is married, this one is a beautiful hearing all the way. Expect moist eyes in the auditorium when the song is on since everyone from Jagjit Singh, Sameer to Aadesh Shrivastava give their all to make 'Kehta Hai Baabul' a memorable song which would make quite a good impact in the film.

With lyrics like 'Bebasi Dard Ka Aalam Hai', one is led to understand that it would continue the sober mode created with 'Kehta Hai Baabul'. A song about a man asking the woman close to him to lend him all her sufferings and pain, it seems to have been created for the situation between John Abraham and Rani Mukherjee. A soft track with a touching orchestra, it has been rendered very well by Kunal Ganjawala who conveys the point 'soft and clear' that he is much more than 'Bheege Hoth Tere'. One of the most balanced songs rendered by Kunal where he has kept the tone and pace consistent with hardly any variation, 'Bebasi' is a meaningful situational track for the film.

After a hiatus Sonu Nigam returns behind the mike with 'Baawri Piya Ki' which starts on an extremely subtle note. If you have been liking lounge music based on Indian classical music that has been quite popular off late, then you would lap up to 'Baawri Piya Ki' too. The song that comes to mind is 'Piya Baanwari' since both the numbers have their roots in Indian classical music with a subtle touch-up by Western instruments. Sonu Nigam excels in 'Baawri Piya' as he goes extremely soft in this love song that comes up for the situation of extreme intimacy between a man and a woman. Yet another track that adds on to the variety of Baabul. Also watch out for the multiple piece orchestra that comes in the middle of the song. It gives a clear indication of Aadesh Srivastava's mastery over the craft!

It's time to return back to some 'masti' and 'mazaa' with 'Gaa Re Mann', a 'qawalli' featuring Amitabh Bachchan and sung by Sudesh Bhonsle. What is notable is that with Big B crossing 60 years of age, Sudesh too brings that 'old man' feel in his rendition and keeps the vocals subdued. The song switches mood 1 minute into the song with arrival of Alka Yagnik as she gets into a filmy romantic rendition. Soon her vocals too merge with the 'qawalli' mood of the track and both she and Sudesh Bhonsle get into a duet. Thereafter they are joined by Kavita Krishnamurthy who croons about the beauty of everyone loving together. A track seemingly picturised on Big B, Hema Malini and Rani Mukherjee, it has a potential to grow if picturised impressively.

Mood of the album changes again with a 'bidaai' situation as Richa Sharma sings 'Baabul-Bidaai' song. With zero instruments in the background, Richa keeps the song in check strictly through the prowess of her vocals as she creates a painful atmosphere as witnessed in every 'bidaai' ceremony after a marriage. Sonu Nigam closes the album with 'Vaada Raha', a short situational love song with a sad undertone. A promise about love staying on forever, this one may find a place in the narrative on multiple occasions.

In two words, soundtrack of Baabul can be defined as HIGH QUALITY. There is not a single moment in the album when one feels cheated or thinks that high claims about the album being distinct are untrue. Instead one just feels the urge of appreciating Aadesh Srivastava for the sheer range he brings in the music of the album. Though 'Come On' is a chartbuster all the way, the songs which are most impressive in the album are those that are soft numbers/situational tracks. These may not turn out to be the tracks that would be played down the street but in a remote corner of your house, they are bound to bring in a tear/smile or two!

Topics: music, review baabul, baghban, baabul movie, b r films, babul
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