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Golmaal

Published: Friday, July 14, 2006, 13:54 [IST]

By: Taran Adarsh, IndiaFM

Friday, July 14, 2006

When you come across a tagline that states 'Fun Unlimited', expecting loads of laughter and entertainment is foremost on your mind. Comedy is the flavor of the season and the feeling that Golmaal - Fun Unlimited may be one of those biggies trying to capitalize on the trend does cross your mind.

Sure, Golmaal - Fun Unlimited is a comedy, but in terms of content, it's not remotely similar to the two comic capers that struck gold this year -- Malamaal Weekly and Phir Hera Pheri. Yes, Golmaal - Fun Unlimited pursues the three golden mantras that No Entry, Maine Pyaar Kyun Kiya, Garam Masala and Phir Hera Pheri followed religiously: [i] Leave your brains at home, [ii] Don't look for logic and [iii] Turn a blind eye to the cinematic liberties.

In terms of plot, Golmaal - Fun Unlimited doesn't offer path-breaking stuff, but sometimes there's more to a movie than story and this is one of those rare occasions when all the other elements pull together and lift the production. Frankly speaking, Golmaal - Fun Unlimited delivers what it promises: Enjoyable moments, amusing jokes and non-stop entertainment.

Wait, there's another reason why Golmaal - Fun Unlimited works...

Comedy isn't all in the material. Having funny lines and amusing gags is only half the battle. The rest is in the delivery and that's where the actors [Ajay, Arshad, Tusshar, Sharman] excel. Some of what's found in Golmaal - Fun Unlimited is laugh-worthy also because of the way in which the actors emote and react.

To sum up, Golmaal - Fun Unlimited may not be the funniest film ever, but it qualifies as a qualitative, well-shot, thoroughly enjoyable entertainer.

The story revolves around Gopal [Ajay Devgan], Lucky [Tusshar Kapoor], Mahadev [Arshad Warsi] and Laxmi [Sharman Joshi] -- four guys bound together by their child-like notoriety, aimlessness and petty business of conning people for fun and money.

Gopal is the wisest and the wickedest of them all and the motto of his life is to eat, drink and make merry. Mahadev and Lucky are also of the opinion that only idiots work and wise men use them in more ways than one to make their life comfortable. As for Laxmi, he is sincere and God-fearing.

Due to their notorious acts, they are thrown out of college and have nowhere to go. Soon, they discover a bungalow that is inhabited by an old, blind couple [Paresh Rawal, Sushmita Mukherjee], whose son, daughter-in-law and grandson are in America.

Gopal and his friends force themselves in the bungalow and make Laxmi pretend that he's Sameer [the blind couple's grandson]. But the story doesn't end there. The four wayward guys fall in love with the same girl [Rimi Sen], suddenly discover a treasure chest and in the end, face the wrath of a gangster who lands up at the bungalow to retrieve his diamonds, which are hidden in the treasure chest.

Writer Neeraj Vora and director Rohit Shetty's fundas are clearly visible at the outset. There's no effort to present a never-seen-before story. Instead, the duo pack those 2.30 hours with gags, punches, witty one-liners and moments that make you smile/laugh from Scene A to Z. Of course, a majority of comic portions work, but there are a few blemishes that stand out.

The college professor [Manoj Joshi] works every time he appears on screen, but the local thug/money lender [Mukesh Tiwari] doesn't. This character seems unwanted/forced in the screenplay and has not much relevance with the main plot. Similarly, the love story between the four guys and the lone heroine appeals, but the villain [Anupam Shyam] isn't convincing enough. Of course, he is not the usual seething-with-anger villain, but a comical character. Yet, Vora could've made the character crazier than what he already is.

Nevertheless, there's no denying that a number of funny moments succeed in bringing the house down. Manoj Joshi's lengthy outburst when he dismisses the four guys from the college is hilarious. Another sequence that's remarkably executed is that of Sharman poisoning Ajay's tea, hoping to eliminate him. The barrage of slaps that both Sharman and Arshad receive in the process is simply maddening. Also, Manoj Joshi arriving at Paresh Rawal's house and Ajay and Arshad impersonating the old couple, with a take-off on BLACK, is another highlight. It's simply howlarious!

Also, the flashback song -- when Paresh narrates his love story and the colors change to B&W -- is a master stroke and will be loved by viewers. Ditto for the 'rape' scene [when the four good-for-nothing heroes 'save' Rimi from getting 'raped'] and also the Valentine's Day portion [Ajay presents rat poison, Sharman gifts the home-made pickle and Arshad hands over toilet paper to Rimi] are enjoyable antics.

Directorially, Rohit Shetty has not only shot the film exceedingly well, but has also concentrated on making each and every sequence thoroughly entertaining. Despite a feeble plot, Shetty and writer Neeraj Vora have ensured that the paying public gets what they seek in the film: Complete time pass entertainment. In that sphere, yes, the film rocks. Even Vora's dialogues are superb.

Vishal-Shekhar's music is decent and gels well with the mood of the film. Stunts [Jai Singh], in minimal doses, are of standard. Cinematography [Aseem Bajaj] is splendid. The film is full of vibrant colors.

The script contains enough hilarious moments to allow each member of the cast to have a chance to shine. Ajay enacts the big bully part with gusto. The actor has worked not only on his looks and physique, but also on portraying the character differently. Arshad is superb, his timing is matchless. In fact, when it comes to making you laugh, few actors can match Arshad's manic energy or consistency.

Tusshar is excellent as a mute character. The actor catches the viewer unaware with a flawless performance. Undoubtedly, this is amongst his most superior performances. Sharman Joshi is a pleasure to watch. To state that he's the most lovable character in the film wouldn't be wrong. The natural flair with which the terrific actor performs and stands out is worth lauding. Outstanding!

Paresh Rawal is in form yet again. He may not be dominating every single frame in the enterprise, but he is supremely efficient whenever he appears on screen. Ditto for Sushmita Mukherjee, who resurfaces on the big screen after a hiatus. Here's a role that does complete justice to her enormous talent. Rimi enacts the mandatory heroine part with ease.

Mukesh Tiwari doesn't really make a mark. Sanjay Mishra too is mediocre. Manoj Joshi excels in the three/four scenes that he's in. Vrajesh Hirjee evokes laughter in the 'snake fight' portion.

On the whole, Golmaal - Fun Unlimited promises laughter and entertainment unlimited. A thoroughly enjoyable fare, the film has all it takes to hit the bull's eye. This clean comedy with no vulgarity won't just make the viewers laugh with its jokes, but also make its distributors laugh all the way to the bank.

Topics: tusshar kapoor, arshad warsi, sharman joshi
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